How to Speak to your Child's Teacher


In this lesson, I'm going to teach you how to speak to your child's teacher. School is about to start and I want you to be ready!


Read a full transcript of the video below:

September is one week away and I thought this lesson would be a great way to help you learn how to communicate with your child's teacher.

Hello, fearless learner, it's Halima. If you don't have children, that's okay. This class will still help you learn new vocabulary. It will also help you learn to communicate with other people, your own teacher. And if you know someone that might find this video beneficial, then you can share this video with them.


Let's get started. So today's focus is how to introduce yourself to a new teacher. How to understand what the teacher says, how to ask the teacher for clarification, if you don't understand something, and how to communicate with the teacher with your own concerns. And at the end of the video, I have a few questions that you might want to ask the teacher that you would like to meet or your I mean, your child's teacher? Yeah, let's begin with how to introduce yourself. It's quite simple. In the UK, it's usually best to address the teacher the same way your child addresses the teacher. Unless the teacher says, Hey, call me this instead. Then you can call them what they asked you to call them. For example, Hello, Mrs. Sheldon, I'm Pfizer and Rasneems mother. Repeat after me again. So hello, this is Sheldon, I'm Pfizer and Rasneems mother. Let's do another example. Hello, Mrs. Sheldon. I'm Tom, I'm Olivia's father. So say it again. Hello, Mrs. Sheldon. I'm Tom, I'm Olivia's father. So change the parts that belong to you so that you can practice your own customised sentences.

Now let's move on to the next part. Understand what the teacher is saying to you. So for example, he says you can say she's having difficulty with her schoolwork. What does difficulty mean? If you have difficulty with something, you're not able to do it easily. If your child's teacher says to you, she says this to you, it means that your child is finding, finding it difficult to complete the work that they're given by the teacher. So she could also change the she or he could also change the last part to homework projects, or assignments.

Let's move on to the next part, your child is acting out. In class, your child is acting out in class, acting out means, to behave badly because you're unhappy or upset. Often in a way that the child is not aware or you're not aware. Sometimes children behave badly in class when there are things going on around them. Another child could be bullying them, or they're feeling stress at home. It could be a number of things, but they don't understand that and so they act out in class and they misbehave they act differently.

Now, in this part, the next part I want you to imagine, you don't understand what the teacher says, Here are a few ways to ask for the teacher to to make things clear. So clarification. Remember that there's no shame in asking for a little help. Don't feel worried or embarrassed. Your main focus is on your child. Let's look at the first one. I'm sorry, I didn't understand what you said. I'm sorry. I didn't understand what you said. I I'm sorry. I didn't understand what you said. I hope that you're repeating at home. Can you please repeat that? Could you please repeat that? Don't be afraid to use body language it can help you communicate. Can you please repeat that? Could you write that down for me? Could you write that down for me? Could you write that down for me? Could you speak more slowly. Could you speak more slowly? Could you speak more slowly?


Now let's say you notice a few problems with your child at home. This is how you can approach the teacher. So you introduce yourself first, like I told you at the beginning of this video, then you say, I'd like a moment with you to speak about my child. I'd like a moment with you to speak about my child, then you can express the problem. So for example, my child doesn't understand your instructions. My child says he's bored at school. My child is having trouble making friends. My child is complaining about bullying. My child is struggling with math, reading, science. Remember, you don't have to say my child all the time, you can say he or she or your child's name. For example, Mary is complaining about bullying, or he is complaining about bullying.

Now let's move on to questions. Here are a few examples of questions that you might want to ask the teacher does my son or daughter need extra help, so you can choose the appropriate gender? This will help you understand what areas you should work on at home? Here's a good question to ask if you're worried about your child's progress in English. Is my child or children, if it's more than one, getting extra help with his or her English? Can she get extra help with English? What's Maria's reading level? Now that one is good, it's a good way to find your child's reading level and help you choose the right books for your child, from the library or from the bookstore.


The last question is to get extra online resources, especially at this time, you're going to need extra online resources for your kids at home. The teacher usually knows the best types of resources for your child. So you could say, can you recommend online resources? Can you recommend online resources? Can you recommend online resources? Okay, so now it's your turn. Can you think of any phrases and sentences to do with teachers or speaking to your teacher? Or speaking to a child's teacher? Let me know in the comments. And what would be even more awesome is if you share this, this video with someone else.

One last thing if you want. If you liked this video and you'd like to work more with me, I actually send weekly emails to my students. All you have to do is click the link in the description and you can download my best tips to help you with your speaking so that you can start start sounding much more fluent and start speaking clearly. Alright guys, I will see you next week. Bye.